Micronutrient fortification

Our commitment: Help reduce the risk of undernutrition through micronutrient fortification



Our commitment: Help reduce the risk of undernutrition through micronutrient fortification

Micronutrient deficiency is a common public health problem, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Our work on micronutrient deficiencies is focused on developing foods and beverages designed to provide nourishment, especially for children and women of childbearing age.


Our objectives

By 2015: We will develop biofortified crops and launch new biofortified products in key markets to expand our fortified products portfolio and benefit rural farming communities.

By 2016: We will reach 200 billion micronutrient-fortified servings of foods and beverages annually worldwide, helping to address global micronutrient deficiencies with a special focus on children and women of childbearing age.

By 2017: Continue to develop the supply chain for biofortified crops and expand our fortified portfolio.


Our progress

Worldwide servings of fortified foods (billion servings) – cumulative

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Year 2013 2014 2015
Billion servings 167+ 183 192

Our delivery of micronutrient-fortified products in 2015 was 192 billion. We also launched our Policy on Micronutrient Fortification, which promotes fortification at levels that improve health without risking adverse consequences from excessive consumption.

We have not fully met our objective to launch new biofortified products. This year, in Nigeria, we tested blending biofortified pro-vitamin maize with normal maize in a recipe. Local agricultural production of these new crop varieties was still very small in 2015, and we are working with farmers and suppliers to increase the harvest in 2016. Biofortification is a complex process that can take years and requires a careful collaborative balance between stakeholders. We are currently working on fortifying other crops including cassava (Côte d’Ivoire) and rice (Madagascar).


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