Whole grains and vegetables

Our commitment: Encourage consumption of whole grains and vegetables



Our commitment: Encourage consumption of whole grains and vegetables


Our objectives

By 2015 – To ensure a high nutritional content, there will be more whole grain than any other ingredient in any serving of children’s or teenagers’ breakfast cereals.

By 2015Maggi Cooking Lesson Programme will be ongoing in 30 countries to promote cooking with whole grains and vegetables.

By 2015 – 90% of Maggi product portfolio worldwide will be promoting home cooking and meals with vegetables.


Our progress

We have introduced more whole grains than any other ingredient in at least 95% of our children’s and teenagers’ breakfast cereal servings (2013: 74%) and have committed to including whole grain as the primary ingredient of 100% of these products by 2015. Today we help consumers identify cereal options with more than 8 g of whole grain per serving, as indicated on packaging with the Green Banner.

At the end of 2014, our Maggi Cooking Lesson Programme was taking place in 20 countries (2013: 16). To date, 73% of the Maggi product portfolio promotes home cooking and meals with vegetables via packaging/promotional materials (2013: 68%).


Our perspective

Whole grains and vegetables are vital for a healthy diet, but many people do not consume enough. Evidence suggests that nine out of 10 people do not reach the recommended level of consumption. This is the reason why we use whole grain to make our breakfast cereals, and why our innovation and renovation programmes aim to increase the whole grain content of our recipes. We have made steady progress in this but, because adding more whole grain impacts on everything from taste and texture to shelf life, we are proceeding with care to achieve a gradual, lasting improvement. We are optimistic that we will be able to convert all our children’s or teenagers’ breakfast cereals to have more whole grain by the end of 2015. The challenge we face around promoting vegetable consumption is the difficulty in tracking whether our efforts translate into long-term behaviour change among consumers.


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Notes:

Products for which 50% or more of consumers are below 12 years of age, or are designed for or perceived as being designed for this age group.

Products for which 50% or more of consumers are below 18 years of age and, within this, more teens than children.