Nutrition Glossary

   

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Saccharide

Saccharide is a technical term used to describe sugars. Chains of sugars, or saccharides, make up carbohydrates. Monosaccharides is a chain of one sugar; disaccharides are a chain of two sugars and polysaccharides are a chain of many sugars.

Satiety

Satiety is the physiological feeling of satisfaction or fullness after a meal.

Saturated Fat

Saturated fat is commonly referred to as ‘bad fat’ because of its impact on blood cholesterol levels. Saturated fats are often solid at room temperature and are the type of fat predominantly found in meat and dairy foods but also in vegetable sources such as palm and coconut oil.

Sodium

Sodium is a mineral that is a component of salt. While our body requires a certain amount of sodium to maintain proper functioning, too much has been associated with increased blood pressure in some people.

Soluble Fibre

Soluble fibre is a type of dietary fibre that is thought to help in lowering cholesterol levels. Beta-glucan is a type of soluble fibre found in high amounts in oats and barley. Fruit and vegetables, dried beans and lentils are other sources of soluble fibre.

Star Choice

Star Choice Registered Products are products that meet nutrient criteria set out by the Western Australia School Canteen Association and the Federation of Canteens in Schools and are approved for sale in accredited canteens. Nutrient criteria set limits for levels of fat, salt, fibre and sugar in foods as well as selected nutrients such as calcium in some categories.

Sugar Alcohols

Sugar alcohols are sugars that have an alcohol chemical group attached to them. Isomalt, sorbitol, lactitol, maltitol, mannitol, xylitol and erythritol are all sugar alcohols. They occur naturally in some fruits & vegetables but most are man-made. Sugar alcohols provide less energy than regular sugar and are commonly used in ‘sugar-free’ foods like hard lollies, chewing gum and throat lozenges. Because sugar alcohols are not broken down by the body, excessive consumption of foods containing sugar alcohols can cause a laxative effect.

Sugars

Also known as saccharides, sugars are the smallest form of carbohydrates. When we digest carbohydrate containing foods they are broken down into single sugars for absorption into the blood. Naturally occurring sugars include fructose (mostly found in fruits) and lactose in milk. Glucose is naturally present in some fruits and honey and sucrose is found in sugar cane and sugar beet. Cakes, biscuits and soft drinks contain added sugars.